The People’s House: A Temple of Democracy, Exhibit Tennessee State Museum

By Betsy Thorpe
Tennessee State Capitol, around 1860
Photo Courtesy Tennessee State Library And Archives

The People’s House: A Temple of Democracy, 150th Anniversary of the Volunteer State Capitol opened at the State Museum on April 1, and will continue through August 9, 2009. The Tennessee State Museum is located at Fifth and Deaderick streets in downtown Nashville. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The museum, which is closed on Mondays, is free to the public.

The Tennessee State Museum’s special sesquicentennial exhibit, marking the 150th anniversary of Tennessee’s State Capitol building opened on April 1st. The special exhibit celebrates the rich history of Tennessee’s most magnificent building and the accomplishments of the Tennessee state government.

The construction of the Capitol was completed in 1859 and was a triumph of both architecture and engineering. State Museum Executive Director Lois Riggins-Ezzell calls the Capitol “the ultimate symbol of our state’s achievements and its rich history — it is a true temple of democracy.” Tennessee’s influence on our nation’s history is shown through various historic documents, paintings, photographs and other items. The exhibits artifacts include, Civil War era photographs, an original letter from David Crockett, written while he served as a Tennessee congressman; a flag carried by the fifth Confederate Regiment a desk owned by Governor Isham Harris; and the inaugural gown worn by First Lady Betty Dunn in 1971.

By celebrating a major milestone in the life of the Capitol, The People’s House: A Temple of Democracy, provides museum visitors with a look at the Tennessee State Capitol building’s fascinating history and into the state of Tennessee’s proud heritage.

Advertisements

One thought on “The People’s House: A Temple of Democracy, Exhibit Tennessee State Museum

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s