Utah’s Nine Mile Canyon officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places


Ute Petroglyphs in Nine Mile Canyon

Following collaboration with the Utah State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service in Washington, D.C., the Bureau Of Land Management Utah’s State Office submitted a National Register nomination for 63 sites located on BLM-administered lands in the Nine Mile Canyon area. The sites fall into three major contexts—prehistoric rock art, West Tavaputs adaptation, and historic period. The nomination followed Nine Mile Canyon being placed on the National Historic Preservation Trust’s “List Of 11 Most Endangered Places” in 2004.

Following collaboration with the Utah State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service in Washington, D.C., the Bureau Utah State Office submitted a National Register nomination for 63 sites located on BLM-administered lands in the Nine Mile Canyon area. The sites fall into three major contexts—prehistoric rock art, West Tavaputs adaptation, and historic period.

The 19 prehistoric rock art sites are home to petroglyphs and pictographs that are characteristic of the region. The 40 West Tavaputs adaptation sites include sites typical of the Fremont period (2,400-550 B.P.); and, the four historic period sites have the remnants of more recent activities such as 19th century homesteading and livestock management.

The BLM in Utah expects this multiple property listing to be the first of many. Presently, 834 sites are known to exist in the area and the BLM Utah plans to nominate 100 of these sites per year—until all of the known properties have been nominated for National Register listing.

The BLM manages more land – 253 million acres – than any other Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The Bureau, with a budget of about $1 billion, also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM’s multiple-use mission is to sustain the health and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. The Bureau accomplishes this by managing such activities as outdoor recreation, livestock grazing, mineral development, and energy production, and by conserving natural, historical, cultural, and other resources on public lands.

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